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Compr Psychiatry. 2010 Mar-Apr;51(2):165-70. doi: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2009.05.004. Epub 2009 Jul 9.

The relationship between depressive symptoms and subjective well-being in newly admitted patients with schizophrenia.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Gil Medical Center, Gachon University of Medicine and Science, Incheon 405-760, South Korea. jhnp@chol.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Depressive symptoms are common in schizophrenia and are considered core features of the disorder. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between depressive symptoms and subjective well-being in newly admitted patients with schizophrenia.

METHODS:

Eighty newly admitted patients were comprehensively evaluated for subjective well-being, schizophrenic symptoms, and depressive symptoms using the Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptics Scale (SWN), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), and the Beck Depression Inventory. Correlation coefficients were obtained between depressive symptoms and subjective well-being while controlling for the influence of the severity of psychotic symptoms, extrapyramidal side effect, and subjective attitude toward antipsychotics, as assessed by the PANSS, the Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Symptoms Scale, and the Drug Attitude Inventory, respectively.

RESULTS:

The SWN score had a significant negative correlation with the PANSS depression factor score (P < .001). Correlation analysis also revealed a significant negative correlation between the SWN score and the Beck Depression Inventory score (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of our study suggest that depressive symptoms are significantly associated with a low subjective well-being in newly admitted patients with schizophrenia and that the relationship is significant even after controlling for the influence of potential confounding variables. Detection and appropriate management of depressive symptoms in schizophrenic patients may affect their perceptions of their own well-being.

PMID:
20152297
DOI:
10.1016/j.comppsych.2009.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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