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World J Surg. 2010 Jul;34(7):1669-75. doi: 10.1007/s00268-010-0455-y.

Predictors of mortality in skin and soft-tissue infections caused by Vibrio vulnificus.

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1
Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, No. 110, Sec. 1, Jianguo N. Rd., Taichung, 40201, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Vibrio vulnificus infection can progress rapidly in skin or soft tissue, and it is potentially life-threatening. The purpose of the present study was to explore the predictors of mortality in patients with V. vulnificus infections of skin or soft tissue.

METHODS:

The medical records of 119 consecutive patients aged > or =18 years, hospitalized for V. vulnificus infections of skin or soft tissue between January 2000 and December 2007 were reviewed. Co-morbidities, clinical manifestations, laboratory studies, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed. Multiple logistic regression with the exact method was performed.

RESULTS:

The mean age of the patients was 63.7 +/- 12.0 years. Twenty-four patients died, yielding an overall case fatality rate of 20%. Of the 24 deaths, 20 (83%) occurred within 72 h after hospital admission. Of 119 patients, 45 patients had primary septicemia, and 74 patients had wound infection. Multivariate analysis revealed that the following factors were associated with mortality: hemorrhagic bullous skin lesions/necrotizing fasciitis (p = 0.003), primary septicemia (p = 0.042), a greater organ dysfunction and/or infection score (p = 0.005), absence of leukocytosis (p = 0.0001), and hypoalbuminemia (p = 0.003). Treatment with surgical intervention plus antibiotics (p = 0.038) and surgical intervention within 24 h after admission (p = 0.017) were protective factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study demonstrates that the presence of hemorrhagic bullous skin lesions/necrotizing fasciitis, primary septicemia, a greater severity-of-illness, absence of leukocytosis, and hypoalbuminemia were the significant risk factors for mortality in these patients. Moreover, patients treated with surgery plus antibiotics, especially those receiving a prompt surgical evaluation within 24 h after hospital admission, may have a better prognosis.

PMID:
20151130
DOI:
10.1007/s00268-010-0455-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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