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Br J Haematol. 2010 Apr;149(2):273-9. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2141.2010.08086.x. Epub 2010 Feb 8.

Genetic susceptibility, smoking, obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism.

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1
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. m.severinsen@rn.dk

Abstract

The F5 G1691A (Factor V Leiden) and F2 G20210A (prothrombin) mutations are linked to an increase in the incidence rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE), but their effects are highly variable. We investigated whether the effects of smoking and obesity might explain this variability. In a case-cohort study including the participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health study, we computed incidence rates and Cox proportional hazard ratios for VTE in individuals with and without the mutations, categorized by weight and tobacco consumption. The sole effect of heavy smoking was 128 extra VTE events per 100,000 person years in individuals with the F5 G1691A mutation versus 59 in individuals without. The sole effect of obesity was 222 extra VTE events per 100,000 person years in individuals with the F5 G1691A mutation, versus 103 in individuals without this mutation; and 705 extra VTE events per 100,000 person years in individuals with the F2 G20210A mutation versus 107 in individuals without this mutation. The F5 G1691A and F2 G20210A mutations conferred increased susceptibility to the unfavourable effects of smoking and obesity on the risk for VTE. Thus, individuals with genetic risk factors for VTE might benefit from maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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