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Open Orthop J. 2010 Jan 5;4:1-6. doi: 10.2174/1874325001004010001.

The dose-response effect of medical exercise therapy on impairment in patients with unilateral longstanding subacromial pain.

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1
Sør-Trøndelag University College, Faculty of Health Education and Social Work, Department of Physical Therapy, N-7004 Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim of this study was to investigate the effect of medical exercise therapy in shoulder impingement patients, along with possible correlations between impairment variables.

STUDY DESIGN:

A prospective unblended randomized clinical trial.

METHODS:

Over four months, 61 participants were randomly assigned into a high-graded exercise therapy group (HD) (n=31) and into a low-graded exercise therapy group (LD) (n=30). Prognostic variables were similar between the groups at baseline. Five (8%) patients dropped out during the treatment period, and another four (6%) dropped out before followup. Pain was a composite score of a visual analogue scale (VAS). Isometric strength was measured during four resisted break tests on the shoulder. Function was measured by means of a functional assessment questionnaire (Shoulder Rating Questionnaire, SRQ). Both groups trained three times per week for twelve weeks, with tests pre- and posttraining and six months follow-up.

RESULTS:

The HD group achieved significantly (p < 0.05) better outcome effects than the LD group for pain, range of motion, isometric functional strength and function, but both groups increased function from pretest to posttest.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with uncomplicated subacromial pain syndrome, medical exercise therapy is an efficient treatment alternative, where high-grade doses should be emphasized. A major limitation is that the measurements were not undertaken by another person than the treating physiotherapists.

KEYWORDS:

Shoulder; dose-response; impingement; muscle function.; physical therapy; rehabilitation

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