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J Trauma Stress. 2010 Feb;23(1):112-5. doi: 10.1002/jts.20488.

Combat-injured service members and their families: the relationship of child distress and spouse-perceived family distress and disruption.

Author information

1
Center for the Study of Traumatic Stress, Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD 20817, USA. scozza@usuhs.mil

Abstract

Combat injury in military service members affects both child and family functioning. This preliminary study examined the relationship of child distress postinjury to preinjury deployment-related family distress, injury severity, and family disruption postinjury. Child distress postinjury was assessed by reports from 41 spouses of combat-injured service members who had been hospitalized at two military tertiary care treatment centers. Families with high preinjury deployment-related family distress and high family disruption postinjury were more likely to report high child distress postinjury. Spouse-reported injury severity was unrelated to child distress. Findings suggest that early identification and intervention with combat-injured families experiencing distress and disruption may be warranted to support family and child health, regardless of injury severity.

PMID:
20146393
DOI:
10.1002/jts.20488
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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