Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
AIDS Care. 2010 Sep;22(9):1029-40. doi: 10.1080/09540120903214389.

Testing a peer-based symptom management intervention for women living with HIV/AIDS.

Author information

1
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. allison.webel@case.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To test the impact of participation in a peer-based intervention for symptom management for women living with HIV infection on selected outcome measures including, symptom intensity, medication adherence, viral control, and quality of life.

DESIGN:

Randomized clinical trial.

METHODS:

Participants were recruited using a convenient, consecutive sampling method. Those participants randomized to the experimental condition attended seven, peer-led sessions over seven weeks. Participants randomized to the control condition received a copy of HIV Symptom Management Strategies: A Manual for People Living with HIV/AIDS. Participants completed four surveys assessing change over time in the aforementioned outcome variables.

RESULTS:

Eighty-nine HIV-infected women followed over 14 weeks and there were no differences between the two groups on baseline demographic variables. Mixed-effects regression indicated no significant difference between groups across time in total symptom intensity score and medication adherence. There was a significant difference between groups across time for two of the nine quality of life scales - HIV Mastery (chi(2)=25.08; p<0.005) and Disclosure Worries (chi(2)=24.67; p<0.005).

CONCLUSIONS:

In urban-dwelling women living with HIV/AIDS, results suggest that a peer-based symptom management intervention may not decrease symptom intensity or increase medication adherence. There is positive evidence that suggests that the intervention may increase some important aspects of quality of life. However, further research is warranted to elucidate the effect of peer-based interventions in achieving positive self-management outcomes.

PMID:
20146111
PMCID:
PMC3131156
DOI:
10.1080/09540120903214389
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Taylor & Francis Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center