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Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2010 Aug;42(8):1557-65. doi: 10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181d34a53.

Palm cooling delays fatigue during high-intensity bench press exercise.

Author information

1
Department of Health, Exercise & Sports Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, 87131-0001, USA. youngsubkwon@hotmail.com

Abstract

Local cooling can induce an ergogenic effect during a short-term intense exercise. One proposed method of personal cooling involves heat extraction from the palm.

PURPOSE:

In this study, we hypothesized that local palm cooling (PC) during rest intervals between progressive weight training sets will increase total repetitions and exercise volume in resistance-trained subjects exercising in a thermoneutral (TN) environment.

METHODS:

Sixteen male subjects (mean +/- SD; age = 26 +/- 6 yr, height = 178 +/- 7 cm, body mass = 81.5 +/- 11.3 kg, one-repetition maximum (1RM) bench press = 123.5 +/- 12.6 kg, weight training experience = 10 +/- 6 yr) performed four sets of 85% 1RM bench press exercise to fatigue, with 3-min rest intervals. Exercise trials were performed in a counterbalanced order for 3 d, separated by at least 3 d: TN, palm heating (PH), and PC. Heating and cooling were applied by placing the hand in a device called the rapid thermal exchanger, set to 45 degrees C for heating or 10 degrees C for cooling. This device heats or cools the palm while negative pressure (-35 to -45 mm Hg) is applied around the hand.

RESULTS:

Total exercise volume during the four PC sets (2480 +/- 636 kg) was significantly higher than that during TN (1972 +/- 632 kg) and PH sets (2156 +/- 668 kg, P < 0.01). The RMS of the surface EMG with PC exercise was higher (P < 0.01), whereas esophageal temperature (P < 0.05) and RPE (P < 0.05) were lower during PC compared with TN and PH.

CONCLUSIONS:

PC from 35 degrees C to 20 degrees C temporarily overrides fatigue mechanism(s) during intense intermittent resistance exercise. The mechanisms for this ergogenic function remain unknown.

PMID:
20139781
DOI:
10.1249/MSS.0b013e3181d34a53
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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