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Cancer Immunol Immunother. 2010 Jul;59(7):989-99. doi: 10.1007/s00262-010-0821-5. Epub 2010 Feb 4.

The anti-tumor effect of Newcastle disease virus HN protein is influenced by differential subcellular targeting.

Author information

1
Medical Department, The Tumor Hospital Affiliated Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, China.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Immunotherapy is emerging as a major player in the current standard of care for aggressive cancers such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The Newcastle disease virus with its tumor-specific replicative and oncolytic abilities is a promising immunotherapeutic candidate. A DNA vaccine expressing the major immunogenic hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein of this virus has shown promising results as an immunotherapeutic agent.

METHODS:

In the present study, three different DNA vaccine constructs encoding differentially targeted HN proteins (cytoplasmic or Cy-HN, secreted or Sc-HN and membrane-anchored or M-HN) were generated to evaluate their anti-tumor effect in vitro and in vivo.

RESULTS:

Although all three DNA constructs elicited an immune response, tumor-bearing mice intratumorally injected with M-HN demonstrated a significantly better anti-tumor effect than those injected with Cy-HN or Sc-HN. We also showed that this anti-tumor effect was mediated by higher lymphocyte proliferative response and CTL activity in mice intratumorally injected with M-HN.

CONCLUSION:

The membrane-anchored form of the HN protein appears to be an ideal candidate to develop as an immunotherapeutic agent for NSCLC.

PMID:
20130861
DOI:
10.1007/s00262-010-0821-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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