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J Hand Surg Am. 2010 Jan;35(1):153-63. doi: 10.1016/j.jhsa.2009.11.004.

Cubital tunnel syndrome.

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1
Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Abstract

Cubital tunnel syndrome is the second most common compression neuropathy in the upper extremity. Patients complain of numbness in the ring and small fingers, as well as hand weakness. Advanced disease is complicated by irreversible muscle atrophy and hand contractures. Ulnar nerve decompression can help to alleviate symptoms and prevent more advanced stages of dysfunction. Many surgical treatments exist for the treatment of cubital tunnel syndrome. In situ decompression, transposition of the ulnar nerve into the subcutaneous, intramuscular, or submuscular plane, or medial epicondylectomy have all been shown to be affective in the treatment of this disease process. Comparative studies have shown some short-term advantages to one or another technique, but overall results between the treatments have essentially been equivocal. The choice of surgical treatment is based on multiple factors, and a single surgical approach cannot be applied to all clinical situations. Through careful consideration of the potential sites of nerve compression and the etiologies for these local irritations, the appropriate surgical technique can be selected and a good outcome anticipated in most patients.

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PMID:
20117320
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhsa.2009.11.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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