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Clin Psychol Rev. 2010 Apr;30(3):349-62. doi: 10.1016/j.cpr.2010.01.001. Epub 2010 Jan 18.

Mental imagery in emotion and emotional disorders.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford, UK. emily.holmes@psych.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

Mental imagery has been considered relevant to psychopathology due to its supposed special relationship with emotion, although evidence for this assumption has been conspicuously lacking. The present review is divided into four main sections: (1) First, we review evidence that imagery can evoke emotion in at least three ways: a direct influence on emotional systems in the brain that are responsive to sensory signals; overlap between processes involved in mental imagery and perception which can lead to responding "as if" to real emotion-arousing events; and the capacity of images to make contact with memories for emotional episodes in the past. (2) Second, we describe new evidence confirming that imagery does indeed evoke greater emotional responses than verbal representation, although the extent of emotional response depends on the image perspective adopted. (3) Third, a heuristic model is presented that contrasts the generation of language-based representations with imagery and offers an account of their differing effects on emotion, beliefs and behavior. (4) Finally, based on the foregoing review, we discuss the role of imagery in maintaining emotional disorders, and its uses in psychological treatment.

PMID:
20116915
DOI:
10.1016/j.cpr.2010.01.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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