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PLoS One. 2010 Jan 27;5(1):e8880. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0008880.

Pego do Diabo (Loures, Portugal): dating the emergence of anatomical modernity in westernmost Eurasia.

Author information

1
Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom. Joao.Zilhao@bristol.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Neandertals and the Middle Paleolithic persisted in the Iberian Peninsula south of the Ebro drainage system for several millennia beyond their assimilation/replacement elsewhere in Europe. As only modern humans are associated with the later stages of the Aurignacian, the duration of this persistence pattern can be assessed via the dating of diagnostic occurrences of such stages.

METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS:

Using AMS radiocarbon and advanced pretreatment techniques, we dated a set of stratigraphically associated faunal samples from an Aurignacian III-IV context excavated at the Portuguese cave site of Pego do Diabo. Our results establish a secure terminus ante quem of ca. 34,500 calendar years ago for the assimilation/replacement process in westernmost Eurasia. Combined with the chronology of the regional Late Mousterian and with less precise dating evidence for the Aurignacian II, they place the denouement of that process in the 37th millennium before present.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE:

These findings have implications for the understanding of the emergence of anatomical modernity in the Old World as a whole, support explanations of the archaic features of the Lagar Velho child's anatomy that invoke evolutionarily significant Neandertal/modern admixture at the time of contact, and counter suggestions that Neandertals could have survived in southwest Iberia until as late as the Last Glacial Maximum.

PMID:
20111705
PMCID:
PMC2811729
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0008880
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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