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Diabetes Technol Ther. 2010 Feb;12(2):149-52. doi: 10.1089/dia.2009.0117.

Timing of bolus in children with type 1 diabetes using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (TiBoDi Study).

Author information

1
Department of Paediatrics, University of Milano, Ospedale Luigi Sacco, 20154 Milan, Italy. scaramuzza.andrea@hsacco.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion is considered a safe and effective way to administer insulin in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes, but achieving satisfactory and stable glycemic control is difficult. Several factors contribute to control, including fine-tuning the basal infusion rate and bolus timing. We evaluated the most effective timing of a pump-delivered, preprandial bolus in children with type 1 diabetes.

METHODS:

We assessed the response of 30 children with type 1 diabetes to a standard meal after different timing of a bolus dose.

RESULTS:

The glucose levels for 3 h after the meal were lower (i.e., closer to the therapeutic target of <140 mg/dL) when the bolus doses were administered 15 min or immediately before the meal, rather than after the meal. However, these differences were not statistically significant, except at the 1-h postprandial time point: bolus just after meal, 177 +/- 71 mg/dL (9.83 +/- 3.94 mmol/L); 15 min before meal, 136 +/- 52 mg/dL (7.55 +/- 2.89 mmol/L) (P = 0.044); and just before meal, 130 +/- 54 mg/dL (7.22 +/- 3.00 mmol/L) (P = 0.024). The area under the curve (AUC) (in mg/min) did not differ significantly with different bolus times, but the SD of the AUC was the lowest with the bolus given 15 min before the meal.

CONCLUSIONS:

These data support injection of the bolus before, rather than after, eating, even if the patient is hypoglycemic before meals.

PMID:
20105045
DOI:
10.1089/dia.2009.0117
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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