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Br J Cancer. 2010 Feb 16;102(4):719-26. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605540. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

p53 mutation, deprivation and poor prognosis in primary breast cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery and Molecular Oncology, Dundee University, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, UK. l.baker@dundee.ac.uk

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The deprivation gap for breast cancer survival remains unexplained by stage at presentation, treatment, or co-morbidities. We hypothesised that p53 mutation might contribute to the impaired outcome observed in patients from deprived communities.

METHODS:

p53 mutation status was determined using the Roche Amplichip research test in 246 women with primary breast cancer attending a single cancer centre and related to deprivation, pathology, overall, and disease-free survival.

RESULTS:

p53 mutation, identified in 64/246 (26%) of cancers, was most common in 10 out of 17 (58.8%) of the lowest (10th) deprivation decile. Those patients with p53 mutation in the 10th decile had a significantly worse disease-free survival of only 20% at 5 years (Kaplan-Meier logrank chi(2)=6.050, P=0.014) and worse overall survival of 24% at 5 years (Kaplan-Meier logrank chi(2)=6.791, P=0.009) than women of deciles 1-9 with p53 mutation (c.f. 56% and 72%, respectively) or patients in the 10th decile with wild-type p53 (no disease relapse or deaths).

CONCLUSION:

p53 mutation in breast cancer is associated with socio-economic deprivation and may provide a molecular basis, with therapeutic implications, for the poorer outcome in women from deprived communities.

PMID:
20104224
PMCID:
PMC2837559
DOI:
10.1038/sj.bjc.6605540
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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