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Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2010 Feb;18(2):128-35. doi: 10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181c796d2.

Antidepressant medication and executive dysfunction: a deleterious interaction in late-life depression.

Author information

1
Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing, NY 11367, USA. joel.sneed@qc.cuny.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether there is differential response to placebo or citalopram among older patients with and without deficient response inhibition (DRI).

DESIGN:

This is an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

SETTING:

Outpatient psychiatry.

PARTICIPANTS:

Unipolar depressed patients aged 75 years and older.

INTERVENTION:

Citalopram (20-40 mg/day) or placebo pill.

MEASUREMENTS:

Baseline Stroop Color-Word Test and weekly 24-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression assessments.

RESULTS:

Citalopram-treated patients with DRI did significantly worse than placebo-treated patients with DRI. Conversely, citalopram-treated patients without DRI did significantly better than placebo-treated patients without DRI.

CONCLUSION:

Patients with late-life depression and DRI respond worse to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) than placebo. These findings suggest that there may be a deleterious interaction between DRI and antidepressant medication in late-life depression and that the mechanism of SSRI and placebo response is different.

PMID:
20104069
PMCID:
PMC2818813
DOI:
10.1097/JGP.0b013e3181c796d2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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