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Br J Surg. 2010 Mar;97(3):366-76. doi: 10.1002/bjs.6889.

Liver resection of colorectal metastases in elderly patients.

Author information

1
Hepatobiliary Centre, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris Hôpital Paul Brousse, University Paris-Sud, Unité Mixte de Recherche S 776, France. rene.adam@pbr.aphp.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study evaluated the outcome of liver surgery for colorectal metastases (CLM) in patients over 70 years old in a large international multicentre cohort.

METHODS:

Among 7764 patients who had resection of CLM, 999 (12.9 per cent) were aged 70-75 years, 468 (6.0 per cent) were aged 75-80 years and 157 (2.0 per cent) were at least 80 years old. Elderly patients were compared with the younger population.

RESULTS:

Multinodular and bilateral metastases were less common in elderly than in younger patients (P < 0.001). Preoperative chemotherapy was used less frequently and more limited surgery was performed (P < 0.001). Sixty-day postoperative mortality and morbidity rates were 3.8 and 32.3 per cent respectively, compared with 1.6 and 28.7 per cent in younger patients (both P < 0.001). Three-year overall survival was 57.1 per cent in elderly and 60.2 per cent in younger patients (P < 0.001), and was similar among patients aged 70-75, 75-80 or at least 80 years (57.8, 55.3 and 54.1 per cent respectively; P = 0.160). Independent predictors of survival were more than three metastases, bilateral metastases, concomitant extrahepatic disease and no postoperative chemotherapy.

CONCLUSION:

Liver resection for CLM in elderly patients can achieve a reasonable 3-year survival rate, with an acceptable morbidity rate. There should be no upper age limit but risk factors may help predict potential benefit.

PMID:
20101645
DOI:
10.1002/bjs.6889
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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