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J Anesth. 2010 Apr;24(2):293-6. doi: 10.1007/s00540-009-0860-2. Epub 2010 Jan 26.

Can intravenous atropine prevent bradycardia and hypotension during induction of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil?

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, 1397-1 Yamane, Hidaka, Saitama, 350-1298, Japan. kmaruyam@saitama-med.ac.jp

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine whether pretreatment with intravenous atropine could prevent bradycardia and hypotension during induction of total intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil in a prospective randomized placebo-controlled manner. Seventy patients, aged 24-78 years, were randomly divided into two groups, and received 0.5 mg atropine or placebo saline 1 min before induction of intravenous anesthesia with remifentanil at 0.4 microg/kg/min, propofol at a target blood concentration of 3 microg/ml, and vecuronium 1.5 mg/kg. Immediately after tracheal intubation, the infusion rate of remfentanil and the target concentration of propofol were reduced to and kept at 0.1 microg/kg/min and 2 microg/ml, respectively, for 10 min. Noninvasive blood pressure (BP) and heartrate (HR) were measured and recorded every minute. Intravenous atropine could prevent a fall in HR, but not a fall in BP, during induction of intravenous anesthesia with propofol and remifentanil of our dosing regimen. Our data suggested that a fall in HR induced by propofol-remifentanil anesthesia was mainly caused by centrally mediated sympatholytic and/or vagotonic actions of propofol and remifentanil, whereas a fall in BP was mainly the result of their direct vasodilating actions.

PMID:
20101512
DOI:
10.1007/s00540-009-0860-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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