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Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2010 Feb 26;393(1):55-60. doi: 10.1016/j.bbrc.2010.01.076. Epub 2010 Jan 25.

Identification of genes related to heart failure using global gene expression profiling of human failing myocardium.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiovascular Medicine, Osaka, Japan.

Abstract

Although various management methods have been developed for heart failure, it is necessary to investigate the diagnostic or therapeutic targets of heart failure. Accordingly, we have developed different approaches for managing heart failure by using conventional microarray analyses. We analyzed gene expression profiles of myocardial samples from 12 patients with heart failure and constructed datasets of heart failure-associated genes using clinical parameters such as pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and ejection fraction (EF). From these 12 genes, we selected four genes with high expression levels in the heart, and examined their novelty by performing a literature-based search. In addition, we included four G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-encoding genes, three enzyme-encoding genes, and one ion-channel protein-encoding gene to identify a drug target for heart failure using in silico microarray database. After the in vitro functional screening using adenovirus transfections of 12 genes into rat cardiomyocytes, we generated gene-targeting mice of five candidate genes, namely, MYLK3, GPR37L1, GPR35, MMP23, and NBC1. The results revealed that systolic blood pressure differed significantly between GPR35-KO and GPR35-WT mice as well as between GPR37L1-Tg and GPR37L1-KO mice. Further, the heart weight/body weight ratio between MYLK3-Tg and MYLK3-WT mice and between GPR37L1-Tg and GPR37L1-KO mice differed significantly. Hence, microarray analysis combined with clinical parameters can be an effective method to identify novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or management of heart failure.

PMID:
20100464
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbrc.2010.01.076
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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