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Br J Clin Psychol. 2010 Nov;49(Pt 4):547-61. doi: 10.1348/014466509X479681. Epub 2010 Jan 22.

Understanding the role of coping in the development of depressive symptoms: symptom specificity, gender differences, and cross-cultural applicability.

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1
Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. randy.auerbach@mail.mcgill.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The primary aim examined whether coping deficits, a greater tendency to utilize maladaptive as opposed to adaptive coping strategies, was associated with increases in depressive symptoms following negative events. The secondary goals examined: the common vulnerability hypothesis, sex differences, and the cross-cultural generalizability.

DESIGN:

Following the initial assessment, Canadian adolescents completed three follow-up assessments every 6 weeks. The Chinese adolescents completed an initial assessment and six follow-up assessments occurring monthly.

METHODS:

At Time 1, 150 Canadian and 397 Chinese adolescents completed self-report measures assessing depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, negative events, and coping. During each of the follow-up assessments, participants completed self-report measures assessing depressive symptoms, anxious symptoms, and negative events.

RESULTS:

In both samples, higher levels of coping deficits were associated with increases in depressive, but not anxious, symptoms following negative events. Gender differences did not emerge.

CONCLUSIONS:

The present study provides a theoretically driven model to examine the impact of broad-based coping on the development of depressive symptoms.

PMID:
20100400
DOI:
10.1348/014466509X479681
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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