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Eplasty. 2010 Jan 8;10:e9.

Wound chemotherapy by the use of negative pressure wound therapy and infusion.

Author information

1
Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance, University of Arizona College of Medicine, 1501 N Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Although the use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is broadly efficacious, it may foster some potentially adverse complications. This is particularly true in patients with diabetes who have a wound colonized with aerobic organisms. Traditional antiseptics have been proven useful to combat such bacteria but require removal of some NPWT devices to be effective.

METHODS:

In this article, we describe a method of "wound chemotherapy" by combining NPWT and a continuous infusion of Dakins' 0.5% solution either as a standardized technique in one device (ITI Sved) or as a modification of standard technique in another (KCI VAC) NPWT device. The twin goals of both techniques are to effectively reduce bacterial burden and to promote progressive wound healing.

RESULTS:

We present several representative case examples of our provisional experience with continuous streaming therapy through 2 foam-based negative pressure devices.

DISCUSSION:

Wound chemotherapy was successfully applied to patients with diabetes, without adverse reactions, complications, or recolonization during the course of treatment. We believe this to be a promising method to derive the benefits of NPWT without the frequent adverse sequela of wound colonization.

PMID:
20090841
PMCID:
PMC2806786

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