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J Nutr. 2010 Mar;140(3):501-8. doi: 10.3945/jn.109.112912. Epub 2010 Jan 20.

Elevated circulating LDL phenol levels in men who consumed virgin rather than refined olive oil are associated with less oxidation of plasma LDL.

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1
Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Reference Center in Food Technology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

Abstract

In human LDL, the bioactivity of olive oil phenols is determined by the in vivo disposition of the biological metabolites of these compounds. Here, we examined how the ingestion of 2 similar olive oils affected the content of the metabolic forms of olive oil phenols in LDL in men. The oils differed in phenol concentrations as follows: high (629 mg/L) for virgin olive oil (VOO) and null (0 mg/L) for refined olive oil (ROO). The study population consisted of a subsample from the EUROLIVE study and a randomized controlled, crossover design was used. Intervention periods lasted 3 wk and were preceded by a 2-wk washout period. The levels of LDL hydroxytyrosol monosulfate and homovanillic acid sulfate, but not of tyrosol sulfate, increased after VOO ingestion (P < 0.05), whereas the concentrations of circulating oxidation markers, including oxidized LDL (oxLDL), conjugated dienes, and hydroxy fatty acids, decreased (P < 0.05). The levels of LDL phenols and oxidation markers were not affected by ROO consumption. The relative increase in the 3 LDL phenols was greater when men consumed VOO than when they consumed ROO (P < 0.05), as was the relative decrease in plasma oxLDL (P = 0.001) and hydroxy fatty acids (P < 0.001). Plasma oxLDL concentrations were negatively correlated with the LDL phenol levels (r = -0.296; P = 0.013). Phenols in LDL were not associated with other oxidation markers. In summary, the phenol concentration of olive oil modulates the phenolic metabolite content in LDL after sustained, daily consumption. The inverse relationship of these metabolites with the degree of LDL oxidation supports the in vivo antioxidant role of olive oil phenolics compounds.

PMID:
20089783
DOI:
10.3945/jn.109.112912
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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