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J Leukoc Biol. 2010 May;87(5):933-42. doi: 10.1189/jlb.1009655. Epub 2010 Jan 20.

CFTR-mediated halide transport in phagosomes of human neutrophils.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana 70112, USA.

Abstract

Chloride serves as a critical component of innate host defense against infection, providing the substrate for MPO-catalyzed production of HOCl in the phagosome of human neutrophils. Here, we used halide-specific fluorescent sensors covalently coupled to zymosan particles to investigate the kinetics of chloride and iodide transport in phagosomes of human neutrophils. Using the self-ratioable fluorescent probe specific for chloride anion, we measured chloride dynamics within phagosomes in response to extracellular chloride changes by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Under the experimental conditions used, normal neutrophils showed rapid phagosomal chloride uptake with an initial influx rate of 0.31 +/- 0.04 mM/s (n=5). GlyH-101, a CFTR(inh), decreased the rate of uptake in a dose-dependent manner. Neutrophils isolated from CF patients showed a significantly slower rate of chloride uptake by phagosomes, having an initial influx rate of 0.043 +/- 0.012 mM/s (n=5). Interestingly, the steady-state level of chloride in CF phagosomes was approximately 26 mM, significantly lower than that of the control ( approximately 68 mM). As CFTR transports chloride as well as other halides, we conjugated an iodide-sensitive probe as an independent approach to confirm the results. The dynamics of iodide uptake by neutrophil phagosomes were monitored by flow cytometry. CFTR(inh)172 blocked 40-50% of the overall iodide uptake by phagosomes in normal neutrophils. In a parallel manner, the level of iodide uptake by CF phagosomes was only 20-30% of that of the control. Taken together, these results implicate CFTR in transporting halides into the phagosomal lumen.

PMID:
20089668
PMCID:
PMC2858676
DOI:
10.1189/jlb.1009655
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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