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J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2010 Jan;19(1):77-86. doi: 10.1089/jwh.2009.1410.

Satisfaction with care among low-income women with breast cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Family Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. athind2@uwo.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Patient satisfaction is an important outcome measure in determining quality of care. There are few data evaluating patient satisfaction in nonwhite, low-income populations. The objective of this study was to identify the structure, process, and outcome factors that impact patient satisfaction with care in a low-income population of women with breast cancer.

METHODS:

In a cross-sectional survey of low-income women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, eligible women enrolled in the California Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program (BCCTP) from February 2003 through September 2005 were interviewed by phone 6 months after their enrollment. This was a population-based sample of women aged >or=18 years (n = 924) with a definitive diagnosis of breast cancer and enrolled in the BCCTP. The main outcome measure was satisfaction with care received.

RESULTS:

Random effects logistic regression revealed that less acculturated Latinas were more likely (odds ratio, [OR] = 5.36, p < 0.000) to be extremely satisfied with their care compared with non-Hispanic white women. Women who believed they could have been diagnosed sooner were less likely to be extremely satisfied (OR = 0.61, p < 0.000). Women who had received or were receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy had nearly twice the odds of being extremely satisfied (OR = 2.02, p < 0.000, and OR = 2.13, p < 0.000, respectively). Greater information giving was associated with greater satisfaction (OR = 1.17, p < 0.000). Women reporting greater physician emotional support were more likely to report being extremely satisfied (OR = 1.26, p < 0.000). A higher participatory treatment decision-making score was associated with greater satisfaction (OR = 1.78, p < 0.000).

CONCLUSIONS:

In a low-income population, satisfaction is also reported at high levels. In addition to age, ethnicity/acculturation, receipt of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, physician emotional support, and collaborative decision making, perception of diagnostic delay is a predictor of dissatisfaction in this population.

PMID:
20088662
PMCID:
PMC3357091
DOI:
10.1089/jwh.2009.1410
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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