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Artif Organs. 2010 Feb;34(2):140-6. doi: 10.1111/j.1525-1594.2009.00769.x. Epub 2010 Jan 18.

In vivo assessment of a new method of pulsatile perfusion based on a centrifugal pump.

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1
Cardiovascular Surgery Department, Clínica Universitaria, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess platelet dysfunction and damage to organs after extracorporeal circulation using a pump based on a new method that adds a pulsatile flow to the continuous flow provided by a centrifugal pump. The continuous component of the total flow (2-3 L/min) is created by a Bio-Pump centrifugal pump, while the pulsatile component is created by the pulsating of an inner membrane pneumatically controlled by an intra-aortic counterpulsation balloon console (systolic volume of 37.5 mL in an asynchronous way with a frequency of 60 bpm). Six pigs were subjected to a partial cardiopulmonary bypass lasting 180 min and were sacrificed 60 min after extracorporeal circulation was suspended. The hematological study included the measurement of hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocytes, and platelet function. The new pump did not significantly alter either platelet count or platelet function. In contrast, hematocrit and hemoglobin were significantly reduced during extracorporeal circulation (approximately 5% P = 0.011, and 2 g/dL P = 0.01, respectively). The leukocyte count during extracorporeal circulation showed a tendency to decrease, but this was not significant. In general, the short-term use of the new pump (4 h) did not cause any serious morphological damage to the heart, lung, kidney, or liver. The results suggest that the hemodynamic performance of the new pump is similar to a conventional centrifugal pump and could therefore be appropriate for use in extracorporeal circulation.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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