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Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol. 2010 Mar;74(3):287-91. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2009.12.005. Epub 2010 Jan 15.

Early resection and reconstruction of head and neck masses in infants with upper airway obstruction.

Author information

1
Division of Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Congenital airway obstruction can be caused by tumors or lesions arising from the neck, tongue and oral cavity. Neonates may require prolonged intubation or tracheostomy before curative resection and reconstruction. The aim of the study was to carry out surgical resection and reconstruction with locoregional flap and free bone graft in the neonatal and early infantile period for definitive management of head and neck masses and treatment of potential airway obstruction.

METHODS:

Newborns with obstructive head and neck masses in Queen Mary Hospital, University of Hong Kong Medical Centre between 2006 and 2009 were operated on in the neonatal period.

RESULTS:

There were one obstructive neck teratoma, two intraoral teratomas and one neuroglial heterotopia. All tumors were resected within the first 3 months of life without major complication. A local cervical cutaneous flap was first used to reconstruct the lateral pharyngeal wall defect in a neonate with a huge neck teratoma, followed by another infant with a neuroglial heterotopia. A piece of cranial bone was used for reconstruction of the skull base defect. None of them required tracheostomy or prolonged intubation. Oral feeding was resumed in the early postoperative period.

CONCLUSION:

Surgical resection and reconstruction with locoregional flap and bone graft can be performed safely in neonatal and early infantile period as management of head and neck masses and treatment of upper airway obstruction.

PMID:
20079943
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijporl.2009.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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