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Int J Radiat Biol. 2010 Jan;86(1):37-46. doi: 10.3109/09553000903137687.

Metamorphosis delay in Xenopus laevis (Daudin) tadpoles exposed to a 50 Hz weak magnetic field.

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  • 1Department of Ecology and Economical Sustainable Development, Tuscia University, Viterbo, Italy. m.severini@unitus.it

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The experiment was performed to prove that exposure to a relatively weak extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic field retards tadpoles' development.

METHODS:

Two cohorts of Xenopus laevis laevis (Daudin) tadpoles were exposed during their immature period ( approximately 60 days) to a 50 Hz magnetic field of 63.9 < or = B < or = 76.4 microT rms (root mean square, average values) magnetic flux density in a solenoid. At the same time, as controls, two comparable cohorts were reared in two aquariums remote from the solenoid. Cohorts' degree of development was quantified by daily inspections of animal limbs and attributing them to a stage of the Nieuwkoop and Faber ( 1956 ) classification. The experiment was replicated three times.

RESULTS:

(a) Mean developmental rate of exposed cohorts was reduced with respect to controls (0.43 vs. 0.48 stages/day, p < 0.001) starting from early larval stages; (b) Exposure increased the mean metamorphosis period of tadpoles by 2.4 days compared with the controls (p < 0.001); (c) Maturation rates of exposed and control tadpoles changed during maturation period; and (d) Important mortality, malformations or teratogenic effects were not observed in exposed matured tadpoles.

CONCLUSION:

A long-term exposure of X. laevis tadpoles to a relatively weak 50 Hz magnetic field causes a sub-lethal effect that slows down their larval developmental rate and delays their metamorphosis.

PMID:
20070214
DOI:
10.3109/09553000903137687
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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