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Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. 2009 Aug;1(2):a001958. doi: 10.1101/cshperspect.a001958.

Chemical gradients and chemotropism in yeast.

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1
Institute of Developmental Biology and Cancer, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis-CNRS UMR6543, Centre de Biochimie, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2, France. arkowitz@unice.fr

Abstract

Chemical gradients of peptide mating pheromones are necessary for directional growth, which is critical for yeast mating. These gradients are generated by cell-type specific secretion or export and specific degradation in receiving cells. Spatial information is sensed by dedicated seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptors and yeast cells are able to detect extremely small differences in ligand concentration across their approximately 5-microm cell surface. Here, I will discuss our current knowledge of how cells detect and respond to such shallow chemical gradients and in particular what is known about the proteins that are involved in directional growth and the establishment of the polarity axis during yeast mating.

PMID:
20066086
PMCID:
PMC2742094
DOI:
10.1101/cshperspect.a001958
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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