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J Occup Environ Med. 2010 Jan;52 Suppl 1:S34-41. doi: 10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181c88525.

Association of workplace chronic and acute stressors with employee weight status: data from worksites in turmoil.

Author information

1
Division of Epidemiology, Department of Community and Preventive Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, 601 ElmwoodAve., Box 644, Rochester, NY 14642, USA. diana_fernandez@urmc.rochester.edu

Erratum in

  • J Occup Environ Med. 2013 Dec;55(12):1488. Su, Hayan [corrected to Su, Haiyan].

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the independent and joint effects of psychosocial chronic and acute stressors with weight status and to report the intraclass correlation coefficient for body mass index (BMI).

METHODS:

Baseline data on 2782 employees from a group-randomized weight gain prevention intervention were examined to investigate the effect of high job strain and job insecurity on BMI and on the odds of overweight/obesity including potential confounders and mediating variables. Data were analyzed using mixed models.

RESULTS:

The mediating variables removed the effect of high job strain on weight (beta = 0.68, P = 0.07; odds ratios = 1.34, confidence interval = 1.00 to 1.80) whereas job insecurity was never significant. Intraclass correlation coefficient for BMI is 0.0195, 0.0193, and 0.0346 overall, for men and women, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

Worksite wellness should target health enhancing behaviors to minimize the health effects of psychosocial work conditions.

PMID:
20061885
PMCID:
PMC2911135
DOI:
10.1097/JOM.0b013e3181c88525
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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