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Acta Cardiol. 2009 Oct;64(5):589-95.

Decrease in plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in the early phase after the start of carvedilol therapy is a novel predictor of long-term outcome in patients with chronic heart failure.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Sciences, University of Tokushima Graduate School of Health Biosciences, Tokushima, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether change in plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level at an early phase of carvedilol therapy is a predictor of improvement in cardiac function and long-term prognosis in patients with systolic chronic heart failure (CHF).

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Neurohumoral factors and haemodynamics were examined in 64 patients with systolic CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) below 45%) before and one month (early phase) and 3 to 6 months (late phase) after the start of carvedilol therapy. These patients were followed up for a mean period of 57 months. Plasma BNP levels were already decreased in the early phase before improvement of LVEF in response to carvedilol therapy. Univariate and multivariate linear regression analyses showed that Delta log brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)E (= log BNP at baseline--log BNP at early phase) (P < 0.0001) was a significant independent predictor of improvement in LVEF in the late phase. Cardiac events occurred in I I patients during the follow-up period. In addition, multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis showed that Delta log BNPE (P = 0.0045) and systolic blood pressure at baseline (P = -0.048) were significant independent predictors of the development of cardiac events.

CONCLUSIONS:

Decrease in plasma BNP level in the early phase of carvedilol therapy is a novel predictor of not only improvement of LVEF in the late phase but also prognosis in patients with systolic CHF.

PMID:
20058503
DOI:
10.2143/AC.64.5.2042687
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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