Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2010 Jul;73(1):30-4. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2009.03766.x. Epub 2009 Dec 18.

Increased mortality and morbidity in mild primary hyperparathyroid patients. The Parathyroid Epidemiology and Audit Research Study (PEARS).

Author information

1
Dundee Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Division of Clinical & Population Sciences & Education, University of Dundee, Scotland, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe mortality and disease-specific morbidities in patients with mild primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT).

DESIGN:

Retrospective population-based observational study.

SETTING:

Tayside, Scotland, from 1997 to 2006.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients with mild PHPT were selected from a predefined PHPT cohort between 1997 and 2006.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were examined for all-cause mortality, as well as cardiovascular and cancer mortality. Standardised morbidity ratios and standardised incidence ratios were also calculated for eleven observed co-morbidities.

RESULTS:

In total, there were 1683 (69.1% female) patients identified with mild PHPT in Tayside. Patients were found to have an increased risk of all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality (SMR-all cause 2.62, 95% CI 2.39-2.86; SMR-cardiovascular 2.68, 95% CI 2.34-3.05). Patients with mild PHPT had a significantly increased risk of developing cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, renal dysfunction and fractures compared to the age- and sex-adjusted general population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mortality and morbidity were increased for patients with mild untreated PHPT, which is similar to more severe PHPT.

Comment in

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Wiley
    Loading ...
    Support Center