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J Invest Dermatol. 2010 Mar;130(3):661-70. doi: 10.1038/jid.2009.411. Epub 2009 Dec 24.

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum: molecular genetics and putative pathomechanisms.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Jefferson Medical College and Jefferson Institute of Molecular Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. Jouni.uitto@jefferson.edu

Abstract

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a prototypic heritable disorder with ectopic mineralization, manifests with characteristic skin findings, ocular involvement and cardiovascular problems, with considerable morbidity and mortality. The classic forms of PXE are due to loss-of-function mutations in the ABCC6 gene, which encodes ABCC6, a transmembrane efflux transporter expressed primarily in the liver. Several lines of evidence suggest that PXE is a primary metabolic disorder, which in the absence of ABCC6 transporter activity, displays reduced plasma anti-mineralization capacity due to reduced fetuin-A and matrix gla-protein (MGP) levels. MGP requires to be activated by gamma-glutamyl carboxylation, a vitamin K-dependent reaction, to serve in an anti-mineralization role in the peripheral connective tissue cells. Although the molecules transported from the hepatocytes to circulation by ABCC6 in vivo remain unidentified, it has been hypothesized that a critical vitamin K derivative, such as reduced vitamin K conjugated with glutathione, is secreted to circulation physiologically, but not in the absence of ABCC6 transporter activity. As a result, activation of MGP by gamma-glutamyl carboxylase is diminished, allowing slow yet progressive mineralization of connective tissues characteristic of PXE. Understanding of the pathomechanistic details of PXE provides a basis for the development of targeted molecular therapies for this currently intractable disease.

PMID:
20032990
PMCID:
PMC3349438
DOI:
10.1038/jid.2009.411
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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