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Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Jan;16(1):55-62. doi: 10.3201/eid1601.090401.

Healthcare-associated viral gastroenteritis among children in a large pediatric hospital, United Kingdom.

Author information

1
Division of Medical Microbiology, University of Liverpool, Daulby St, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK. n.a.cunliffe@liv.ac.uk

Abstract

Viruses are the major pathogens of community-acquired (CA) acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children, but their role in healthcare-associated (HA) AGE is poorly understood. Children with AGE hospitalized at Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool, UK, were enrolled over a 2-year period. AGE was classified as HA if diarrhea developed > or =48 hours after admission. Rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus 40/41, astrovirus, and sapovirus were detected by PCR. A total of 225 children with HA-AGE and 351 with CA-AGE were enrolled in the study. HA viral gastroenteritis constituted one fifth of the diarrheal diseases among hospitalized children and commonly occurred in critical care areas. We detected > or =1 virus in 120 (53%) of HA-AGE cases; rotavirus (31%), norovirus (16%), and adenovirus 40/41 (15%) were the predominant viruses identified. Molecular evidence indicated rotaviruses and noroviruses were frequently introduced into the hospital from the community. Rotavirus vaccines could substantially reduce the incidence of HA-AGE in children.

PMID:
20031043
PMCID:
PMC2874353
DOI:
10.3201/eid1601.090401
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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