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Diabetes. 2010 Mar;59(3):741-6. doi: 10.2337/db09-0920. Epub 2009 Dec 22.

Detailed investigation of the role of common and low-frequency WFS1 variants in type 2 diabetes risk.

Author information

1
Metabolic Disease Group, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. In this study we aimed to refine this association and investigate the role of low-frequency WFS1 variants in type 2 diabetes risk.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

For fine-mapping, we sequenced WFS1 exons, splice junctions, and conserved noncoding sequences in samples from 24 type 2 diabetic case and 68 control subjects, selected tagging SNPs, and genotyped these in 959 U.K. type 2 diabetic case and 1,386 control subjects. The same genomic regions were sequenced in samples from 1,235 type 2 diabetic case and 1,668 control subjects to compare the frequency of rarer variants between case and control subjects.

RESULTS:

Of 31 tagging SNPs, the strongest associated was the previously untested 3' untranslated region rs1046320 (P = 0.008); odds ratio 0.84 and P = 6.59 x 10(-7) on further replication in 3,753 case and 4,198 control subjects. High correlation between rs1046320 and the original strongest SNP (rs10010131) (r2 = 0.92) meant that we could not differentiate between their effects in our samples. There was no difference in the cumulative frequency of 82 rare (minor allele frequency [MAF] <0.01) nonsynonymous variants between type 2 diabetic case and control subjects (P = 0.79). Two intermediate frequency (MAF 0.01-0.05) nonsynonymous changes also showed no statistical association with type 2 diabetes.

CONCLUSIONS:

We identified six highly correlated SNPs that show strong and comparable associations with risk of type 2 diabetes, but further refinement of these associations will require large sample sizes (>100,000) or studies in ethnically diverse populations. Low frequency variants in WFS1 are unlikely to have a large impact on type 2 diabetes risk in white U.K. populations, highlighting the complexities of undertaking association studies with low-frequency variants identified by resequencing.

PMID:
20028947
PMCID:
PMC2828659
DOI:
10.2337/db09-0920
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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