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Surg Laparosc Endosc Percutan Tech. 2009 Dec;19(6):497-500. doi: 10.1097/SLE.0b013e3181bd8d6f.

Treatment of incisional hernias adopting an intra-abdominal approach with a new low-density composite prosthetic material: proceed: our preliminary experience on 50 cases.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Abdominal Wall Unit, University Hospital Morales Meseguer, Murcia, Spain. moreno-egea@ono.com

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The management of incisional hernias remains a challenge for the general surgeon. Repairing by using prosthetic materials has reduced the relapse rate, but intra-abdominal mesh placement continues to be a source of controversy.

OBJECTIVE:

An evaluation is made of the results of treating incisional hernias with a new intra-abdominal low-density composite mesh through both the open and the laparoscopic approach.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

A prospective analysis was made on the first 50 patients operated upon for incisional hernia through the open (n=20) or laparoscopic route (n=30), with intra-abdominal repair using the Proceed composite mesh, composed of low-density polypropylene and a hydrophilic antiadherent membrane of oxidized regenerated cellulose.

RESULTS:

There were no patient deaths. Reintervention proved necessary in one case due to hemoperitoneum caused by a trocar. The mean duration of stay was 3 days, and all patients recovered bowel transit within 24 hours. During follow-up there were no intra-abdominal complications associated with the use of the mesh (intestinal occlusion or subocclusion, prolonged ileus, infections, rejection, fistulas, or relapses).

CONCLUSIONS:

Incision hernia repair using the intra-abdominal low-density composite mesh is safe and well tolerated. Proceed mesh facilitates laparoscopic hernioplasty maneuvering.

PMID:
20027095
DOI:
10.1097/SLE.0b013e3181bd8d6f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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