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Med Clin (Barc). 2010 Apr 24;134(12):528-33. doi: 10.1016/j.medcli.2009.09.042.

Relationship between increased arterial stiffness and other markers of target organ damage.

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1
Hospital de Sagunto, Agencia Valenciana de Salud, Sagunto, Valencia, España.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES:

The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship of arterial stiffness with other markers of target organ damage, and the clinical factors related to it.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Cross-sectional study that included 208 (115 men) never treated hypertensive, non-diabetic patients (mean age, 49+/-12 years). In addition to a full clinical study, 24h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), and determination of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and microalbuminuria were performed. Clinical arterial stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) obtained with applanation tonometry (SphygmoCor-System).

RESULTS:

PWV was 8.3 (7.3-9.9)m/s (median, interquartile range). Stepwise regression analysis revealed that age (beta=0.086, p<0.001), 24-h pulse pressure (beta=0.058, p<0.001), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (beta=0.009, p<0.013) were independent determinants of PWV. PWV>12m/s (indicating target organ lesion) was present in only 16 (7.7%) patients, less frequent than LVH (28% of the patients) and microalbuminuria (16%). However, of the 16 patients with elevated PWV, 10 (62%) had neither LVH or microalbuminuria. In a logistic multivariate regression analysis the factors related to elevated PWV were age > or =45 in man and > or =55 in women (OR: 23.8, 95% CI: 2.7-195.5; p=0.004), LDL cholesterol > or =160mg/dl (OR: 10.6, 95% CI: 2.6-42.7; p=0.001) and increased 24-h pulse pressure > or =55mmHg (OR: 3.9, 95% CI: 1.2-12.9; p=0.03).

CONCLUSIONS:

In untreated middle age hypertensives arterial stiffness assessed by PWV is less frequent than LVH or microalbuminuria. PWV is mainly related to age, LDL cholesterol, and pulse pressure values.

PMID:
20022065
DOI:
10.1016/j.medcli.2009.09.042
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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