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Nutrition. 2010 Nov-Dec;26(11-12):1082-7. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.023. Epub 2009 Dec 16.

Safety and tolerance of the human milk probiotic strain Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 in 6-month-old children.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Universitario San Cecilio, Granada, Spain.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the prevention of certain diseases during the pediatric years. Thus, there is an increasing interest in the addition of probiotics to infant formulas. The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety of a follow-on formula with Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 in 6-mo-old children.

METHODS:

The antibiotic susceptibility of L. salivarius CECT5713 was analyzed by a dilution method. A double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled study was performed. Children (n = 80) were distributed in two groups and consumed the formula supplemented or not with probiotics (2 × 10(6) colony-forming units [cfu]/g) during 6 mo. Fecal samples were collected at enrollment, at 3 mo, and at the end of trial. Clinical and anthropometric evaluations were performed. Depending on the variable, one-way or two-way repeated measures analysis of variance were used for the statistical analysis.

RESULTS:

The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the strain resulted as safe. No adverse effects associated with the consumption of the probiotic formula were reported. In addition, clinical parameters did not differ between groups. Consumption of the probiotic supplemented formula led to an increase in the fecal lactobacilli content (7.6 ± 0.2 versus 7.9 ± 0.1 log cfu/g, P < 0.05). Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 was detected in the feces of volunteers from the probiotic group. Probiotic consumption induced a significant increase in the fecal concentration of butyric acid at 6 mo.

CONCLUSION:

Thus, a follow-on formula with L. salivarius CECT5713 is safe and well tolerated in 6-mo-old infants.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00724204.

PMID:
20018483
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2009.08.023
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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