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J Forensic Sci. 2010 Jan;55(1):129-35. doi: 10.1111/j.1556-4029.2009.01244.x. Epub 2009 Dec 10.

Analysis of pigmented inkjet printer inks and printed documents by laser desorption/mass spectrometry.

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1
Department of Chemistry, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628, USA.

Abstract

Anyone with a computer, scanner, and color printer has the capability for creating documents such as identification cards, passports, and counterfeit currency. Laser desorption mass spectrometry (LDMS) has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for colorant analysis. Inkjet printers are now moving largely toward the use of pigments as colorants; their insolubility makes analysis by simpler methods such as thin-layer chromatography no longer an option. Recent developments in pigmented inkjet printer inks, such as gloss optimizers that coat pigment particles, may prohibit colorant analysis by LDMS. We demonstrate here that pigments used in inks from two Epson printers can be detected and analyzed by LDMS. Also, LDMS spectra of various colors created using a 4-cartridge (cyan/magenta/yellow/black, CMYK) inkset are evaluated, to begin to develop an approach for unraveling LDMS data from real samples, to determine the number of inks used by a printer, and the chemical composition of the colorants.

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