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Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2009;35(6):399-407. doi: 10.3109/00952990903353415.

Multiple risk factor model predicting cannabis use and use disorders: a longitudinal study.

Author information

1
School of Population Health, The University of Queensland, Herston Road, Herston, Qld 4006, Australia. m.hayatbakhsh@uq.edu.au

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Identification of factors associated with the initiation and continuation of cannabis use is important for any preventive work.

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to examine the early life course predictors of cannabis use and the development of cannabis use disorder in early adulthood.

METHODS:

Data from Mater Hospital and University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP), a population-based prospective birth cohort study. Participants were a cohort of 2,493 young adults who completed the life-time version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview-computerized version (CIDI-Auto) at the 21-year follow-up, and for whom data were available from previous follow-ups. Ever use and age at first use of cannabis was assessed via self-report, and cannabis use disorder was measured based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version IV (DSM-IV) diagnostic criteria. Life course predictors were obtained between the child's birth and the 14-year follow-up.

RESULTS:

Of 2,493 young adults, 51.4% reported having ever used cannabis, and 21.1% of young adults were classified as having ever had a cannabis use disorder. Child's gender, changes in maternal marital status, maternal smoking, child school performance, childhood sexual abuse, early adolescence smoking and alcohol consumption, and adolescent aggression/delinquency were strongly associated with young adult cannabis use and use disorder. Exposure to multiple risk factors was associated with greater risk of outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS:

There are a number of strong predictors of cannabis use identified in this study. They suggest that the social context within which children are reared has a major influence on cannabis use and use disorders.

PMID:
20014907
DOI:
10.3109/00952990903353415
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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