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J Biomed Biotechnol. 2010;2010:384523. doi: 10.1155/2010/384523.

Infection with Hymenolepis diminuta is more effective than daily corticosteroids in blocking chemically induced colitis in mice.

Author information

1
Gastrointestinal Research Group, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Calvin, Phoebe & Joan Snyder Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4N1.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare infection with the tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, with steroid (dexamethasone) administration in the inhibition of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS-) induced colitis in mice.

PROCEDURES:

Mice were treated with DNBS +/- infected with H. diminuta or treated with daily dexamethasone (2 mg/Kg, ip.) and were assessed 72 hours post-DNBS by the calculation of disease activity and histological damage scores, and spleen cell cytokine production.

RESULTS:

H. diminuta-infected mice showed increased IL-4 and IL-10 production by spleen cells compared to other groups and were protected from DNBS-induced colitis. In contrast, there was little benefit of dexamethasone in the treatment of colitis. Collagen deposition in the colon was not different between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

H. diminuta was superior to dexamethasone in the prevention of DNBS-induced colitis and did not result in additional side effects (i.e., collagen deposition). Comparisons with current therapeutics and long-term followup to studies are essential if "helminth therapy" is to become a viable treatment for specific inflammatory diseases in the gut or other tissues.

PMID:
20011066
PMCID:
PMC2789531
DOI:
10.1155/2010/384523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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