Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Fam Community Health. 2010 Jan-Mar;33(1):53-67. doi: 10.1097/FCH.0b013e3181c4e2d4.

Social, economic, and political processes that create built environment inequities: perspectives from urban African Americans in Atlanta.

Author information

1
Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. yar5@cdc.gov

Abstract

Growing evidence suggests that the built environment features found in many high-poverty urban areas contribute to negative health outcomes. Both built environment hazards and negative health outcomes disproportionately affect poor people of color. We used community-based participatory research and Photovoice in inner-city Atlanta to elicit African Americans' perspectives on their health priorities. The built environment emerged as a critical factor, impacting physical and mental health outcomes. We offer a conceptual model, informed by residents' perspectives, linking social, economic, and political processes to built environment and health inequities. Research, practice, and policy implications are discussed within an environmental justice framework.

PMID:
20010005
DOI:
10.1097/FCH.0b013e3181c4e2d4
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Support Center