Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2010 Feb;53(2):247-53. doi: 10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181c6c4b7.

The association between alcohol consumption and prevalent cardiovascular diseases among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men.

Author information

1
Division of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. freibergms@upmc.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether alcohol consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-infected veterans.

METHODS:

Using established thresholds for alcohol consumption, we analyzed cross-sectional data from 4743 men (51% HIV infected) from the Veterans Aging Cohort Study, a prospective cohort of HIV-infected veterans and demographically similar HIV-uninfected veterans. Using logistic regression, we estimated the odds ratio (OR) for the association between alcohol consumption and prevalent CVD.

RESULTS:

Among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men, respectively, hazardous drinking (33.2% vs. 30.9%,), alcohol abuse and dependence (20.9% vs. 26.2%), and CVD (14.6% vs. 19.8%) were common. Among HIV-infected men, hazardous drinking [OR = 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.05 to 1.94] and alcohol abuse and dependence (OR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.23) were associated with a higher prevalence of CVD compared with infrequent and moderate drinking. Among HIV-uninfected men, past drinkers had a higher prevalence of CVD (OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.67). For HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men, traditional risk factors and kidney disease were associated with CVD.

CONCLUSIONS:

Among HIV-infected men, hazardous drinking and alcohol abuse and dependence were associated with a higher prevalence of CVD compared with infrequent and moderate drinking even after adjusting for traditional CVD risk factors, antiretroviral therapy, and CD4 count.

PMID:
20009766
PMCID:
PMC2858978
DOI:
10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181c6c4b7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center