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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2010 Apr;52(4):379-85. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2009.03343.x. Epub 2009 Dec 1.

Predicting school readiness from neurodevelopmental assessments at age 2 years after respiratory distress syndrome in infants born preterm.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital and LaRabida Children's Hospital, IL, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To determine whether neurodevelopmental outcomes at the age of 2 years accurately predict school readiness in children who survived respiratory distress syndrome after preterm birth.

METHOD:

Our cohort included 121 preterm infants who received surfactant and ventilation and were enrolled in a randomized controlled study of inhaled nitric oxide for respiratory distress syndrome. Abnormal outcomes at the age of 2 years were defined as neurosensory disability (cerebral palsy, blindness, or bilateral hearing loss) or delay (no neurosensory disability but Bayley Scales of Infant Development mental or performance developmental index scores <70). School readiness (assessed at a mean age of 5y 6mo, SD 1y) was determined using neurodevelopmental assessments of motor, sensory, receptive vocabulary, perceptual, conceptual, and adaptive skills.

RESULTS:

The mean birthweight of the cohort (57 males, 64 females) was 987g (SD 374), and the mean gestational age was 27.3 weeks (SD 2.6). At the age of 2 years, the neurodevelopmental classification was 'disabled' in 11% and 'delayed' in 23%. At the age of 5 years 6 months, intensive special education was required for 11% and some special education for 21%. Disability and delay at the age of 2 years were 92% and 50% predictive of lack of school readiness respectively, whereas only 15% of children who were normal at the age of 2 years were not school ready at the later assessment. Children with delay at 2 years were more likely to need special education if they were socially disadvantaged.

INTERPRETATION:

Without preschool developmental supports, preterm survivors living in poverty will require more special education services.

PMID:
20002128
PMCID:
PMC2892793
DOI:
10.1111/j.1469-8749.2009.03343.x
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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