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J Neuropsychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2009 Fall;21(4):420-9. doi: 10.1176/appi.neuropsych.21.4.420.

Aggression after traumatic brain injury: prevalence and correlates.

Author information

1
Division of Neuropsychiatry & Geriatric Psychiatry, Dept. of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University, 5300 Alpha Commons Dr., 4th Floor, #444, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA. vrao@jhmi.edu

Abstract

Aggression after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common but not well defined. Sixty-seven participants with first-time TBI were evaluated for aggression within 3 months of injury. The prevalence of aggression was found to be 28.4%, predominantly verbal aggression. Post-TBI aggression was associated with new-onset major depression (p=0.02), poorer social functioning (p=0.04), and increased dependency in activities of daily living (p=0.03), but not with a history of substance abuse or adult/childhood behavioral problems. Implications of the study include early screening for aggression, evaluation for depression, and consideration of psychosocial support in aggressive patients.

PMID:
19996251
PMCID:
PMC2918269
DOI:
10.1176/jnp.2009.21.4.420
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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