Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Psychosomatics. 2009 Nov-Dec;50(6):563-9. doi: 10.1176/appi.psy.50.6.563.

Sex differences in the prevalence of post-stroke depression: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Depression after stroke occurs in 33% of individuals. It is grossly underdiagnosed and untreated.

OBJECTIVE:

The authors studied sex differences in the prevalence of post-stroke depression (PSD), which have not been adequately studied, and may have important implications for clinicians.

METHOD:

The authors performed a systematic review of five databases of all observational studies that stratified data by sex, measuring the prevalence of PSD.

RESULTS:

Fifty-six publications, including 47 primary studies between 1982 and 2006, met eligibility criteria and were included in the review. A total of 75,131 subjects comprised these studies, with 11,910 women and 62,899 men.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of depression among women was higher in 35 studies. Moreover, the prevalence was generally higher among inpatient populations (both in acute-care and rehabilitation facilities) than in community-dwelling subjects.

CONCLUSIONS:

PSD is highly prevalent in both sexes, but appears to be slightly more common among women than men. Untreated depression after stroke can lead to a reduced quality of life, poorer prognosis, and increased mortality. All stroke patients should be routinely screened for depression, and further research is needed to determine whether there are sex-specific differences in response to treatment.

PMID:
19996226
DOI:
10.1176/appi.psy.50.6.563
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center