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Int J Psychiatry Med. 2009;39(3):313-23.

The role of brief motivational intervention on self-efficacy and abstinence in a cohort of patients with alcohol dependence.

Author information

1
Hôpital Louis Mourier/AP-HP, and Université Paris X-Nanterre, France.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Brief interventions are effective in reducing heavy drinking in the general population but few studies examined whether it is also effective in alcohol dependent patients, and whether brief intervention increases self-efficacy.

METHOD:

One hundred and seven patients with alcohol-dependence were randomized in a controlled trial examining the efficacy of a brief motivational intervention on both self-efficacy level and days of abstinence.

RESULTS:

We found that brief motivational interventions had no effect on days of abstinence, nor on self-efficacy, but that high self-efficacy was consistently correlated with a longer period of abstinence, at all assessment-points.

CONCLUSION:

Self-efficacy appears to be a crucial prognosis factor, and is not influenced by brief motivational interventions. Other types of specific psychotherapy, probably more intensive, may be more efficient in alcohol-dependent patients than motivational interventions.

PMID:
19967902
DOI:
10.2190/PM.39.3.g
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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