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Ann Hum Biol. 2010 Apr;37(2):136-48. doi: 10.3109/03014460903393857.

Population differences in allele frequencies at the OLR1 locus may suggest geographic disparities in cardiovascular risk events.

Author information

1
Department of Biopathology and Diagnostic Imaging, Section of Medical Genetics, School of Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Via Montpellier 1, Rome, Italy. irenemartapredazzi@yahoo.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Several studies have demonstrated a link between cardiovascular disease (CVD) susceptibility and the genetic background of populations. Endothelial activation and dysfunction induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is one of the key steps in the initiation of atherosclerosis. The oxidized low density lipoprotein (lectin-like) receptor 1 (OLR1) gene is the main receptor of ox-LDL. We have previously characterized two polymorphisms (rs3736235 and rs11053646) associated with the risk for coronary artery disease (CAD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI).

AIM:

Given their clinical significance, it is of interest to know the distribution of these variants in populations from different continents.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

A total of 1229 individuals from 17 different African, Asian and European populations was genotyped for the two considered markers.

RESULTS:

The high frequencies of ancestral alleles in South-Saharan populations is concordant with the African origin of our species. The results highlight that African populations are closer to Asians, and clearly separated from the Europeans.

CONCLUSION:

The results confirm significant genetic structuring among populations and suggest a possible basis for varying susceptibility to CVD among groups correlated with the geographical location of populations linked with the migrations out of Africa, or with different lifestyle.

PMID:
19961348
DOI:
10.3109/03014460903393857
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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