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J Clin Sleep Med. 2009 Jun 15;5(3):215-21.

Prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients with obstructive sleep apnea in a multi-ethnic sample.

Author information

1
Section of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. kmahmood@uic.edu

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

Relationship of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes in Caucasians has been studied, but this association has not been investigated in Hispanic and African-Americans. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of type 2 diabetes in patients evaluated for OSA in a predominantly African American and Hispanic sample. The secondary objective is to evaluate the relationship of REM related OSA and type 2 diabetes.

METHODS:

1008 consecutive patients who had a comprehensive polysomnography were evaluated. OSA was defined as an obstructive apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) of > or = 5 per hour. REM AHI of > or = 10 was considered to indicate REM related OSA.

RESULTS:

The prevalence of type 2 diabetes was 30.1% in the group with OSA compared to 18.6% in those without OSA. The subjects with OSA had significantly increased odds of type 2 diabetes compared with those without OSA (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.3-2.6) but this association became non-significant when controlled for confounding variables and covariates (odds ratio = 1.3, 95% confidence interval: 0.9-2.0). Middle-aged participants with OSA had 2.8 times higher odds for type 2 diabetes, when compared to younger or middle aged without OSA, controlling for covariates. Finally, the odds of type 2 diabetes were 2.0 times higher in patients with REM AHI of > or = 10/h independent of confounding variables.

CONCLUSIONS:

OSA is not independently associated with type 2 diabetes in a predominantly African American and Hispanic sample. However, the relationship of REM related OSAwith type 2 diabetes may be statistically significant.

PMID:
19960641
PMCID:
PMC2699165
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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