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Exp Cell Res. 1991 Mar;193(1):213-8.

Behavior of a transitional tubulovesicular compartment at the cis side of the Golgi apparatus in in vivo fusion studies of mammalian cells.

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1
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg 24061.

Abstract

We have investigated the behavior in in vivo cell fusion experiments of a transitional compartment lying between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus to determine if the compartment, as recognized by the antibody G1/93, might congregate in a similar manner to Golgi apparatus [W. C. Ho et al. (1990) Eur. J. Cell Biol. 52, 315-327]. The distributions of the transitional tubulovesicular compartment, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus in HeLa cells were assessed by immunofluorescent staining using mouse monoclonal antibody G1/93, mouse monoclonal antibody HP 24, and rabbit anti-galactosyltransferase, respectively. In agreement with previous results [W. C. Ho et al. (1990) Eur. J. Cell Biol. 52, 315-327], the Golgi apparatus was observed to congregate gradually over a 3- to 6-h period, forming a large, extended, central Golgi complex in uv-inactivated Sindbis virus-fused HeLa cells. Concomitant with this was a marked congregation of the transitional tubulovesicular compartment. Congregation of the tubulovesicular compartment was not affected by cycloheximide. The endoplasmic reticulum retained its web-like distribution throughout the syncytoplasm and rimmed the nuclear periphery. Treatment of HeLa cells with nocodazole prior to fusion followed by incubation of the syncytia in drug-containing media blocked congregation of the G1/93-positive compartment. With this long-term nocodazole treatment, Golgi apparatus was dispersed into scattered Golgi elements and the G1/93 distribution was endoplasmic reticulum-like. These results suggest that the transitional tubulovesicular compartment recognized by G1/93 is normally structured on microtubules and microtubule organizing centers and may be considered to be a subcompartment of a greater, perinuclear, Golgi complex.

PMID:
1995296
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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