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J Cardiopulm Rehabil Prev. 2010 Mar-Apr;30(2):126-36. doi: 10.1097/HCR.0b013e3181be7e59.

Disability in valued life activities among individuals with COPD and other respiratory conditions.

Author information

1
University of California, San Francisco, 3333 California St, Ste 270, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. patti.katz@ucsf.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to delineate the effect of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on a broad range of valued life activities (VLAs) and make comparisons to effects of other airways conditions.

METHODS:

We used cross-sectional data from a population-based, longitudinal study of US adults with airways disease. Data were collected by telephone interview. VLA disability was compared among 3 groups defined by reported physician diagnoses: COPD/emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and asthma. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of VLA disability.

RESULTS:

About half of individuals with COPD were unable to perform at least 1 VLA; almost all reported at least 1 VLA affected. The impact among individuals with chronic bronchitis and asthma was less but still notable: 74%-84% reported at least 1 activity affected, and about 15% were unable to perform at least 1 activity. In general, obligatory activities were the least affected. Symptom measures and functional limitations were the strongest predictors of disability, independent of respiratory condition.

CONCLUSION:

VLA disability is common among individuals with COPD. Obligatory activities are less affected than committed and discretionary activities. A focus on obligatory activities, as is common in disability studies, would miss a great deal of the impact of these conditions. Because individuals are often referred to pulmonary rehabilitation as a result of dissatisfaction with ability to perform daily activities, VLA disability may be an especially relevant outcome for rehabilitation.

PMID:
19952768
PMCID:
PMC3160755
DOI:
10.1097/HCR.0b013e3181be7e59
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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