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Chest. 2010 Mar;137(3):521-8. doi: 10.1378/chest.09-0357. Epub 2009 Dec 1.

Predictors for treating obstructive sleep apnea with an open nasal cannula system (transnasal insufflation).

Author information

1
HELIOS-Klinik Hagen-Ambrock Germany. georg.nilius@helios-kliniken.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Although continuous positive airway pressure effectively treats OSA, compliance is variable because of the encumbrance of wearing a sealed nasal mask throughout sleep. In a small group of patients, it was recently shown that an open nasal cannula (transnasal insufflation [TNI]) can treat OSA. The aim of this larger study was to find predictors for treatment responses with TNI.

METHODS:

Standard sleep studies with and without TNI were performed in 56 patients with a wide spectrum of disease severity. A therapeutic response was defined as a reduction of the respiratory disturbance index (RDI) below 10 events/h associated with a 50% reduction of the event rate from baseline and was used to identify subgroups of patients particularly responsive or resistant to TNI treatment.

RESULTS:

For the entire group (N = 56), TNI decreased the RDI from 22.6 +/- 15.6 to 17.2 +/- 13.2 events/h (P < .01). A therapeutic reduction in the RDI was observed in 27% of patients. Treatment responses were similar in patients with a low and a high RDI, but were greater in patients who predominantly had obstructive hypopneas or respiratory effort-related arousals and in patients who predominantly had rapid eye movement (REM) events. The presence of a high percentage of obstructive and central apneas appears to preclude efficacious treatment responses.

CONCLUSION:

TNI can be used to treat a subgroup of patients across a spectrum from mild-to-severe sleep apnea, particularly if their sleep-disordered breathing events predominantly consist of obstructive hypopneas or REM-related events but not obstructive and central apneas.

PMID:
19952061
DOI:
10.1378/chest.09-0357
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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