Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neurosurg Clin N Am. 2010 Jan;21(1):111-23. doi: 10.1016/j.nec.2009.09.002.

Heat shock proteins in glioblastomas.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, Room M779, Campus 0112, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. yangi@neurosurg.ucsf.edu

Abstract

Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary central nervous system tumor. The prognosis for these malignant brain tumors is poor, with a median survival of 14 months and a 5-year survival rate below 2%. Development of novel treatments is essential to improving survival and quality of life for these patients. Endogenous heat shock proteins have been implicated in mediation of both adaptive and innate immunity, and there is a rising interest in the use of this safe and multifaceted heat shock protein vaccine therapy as a promising treatment for human cancers, including glioblastoma multiforme.

PMID:
19944971
DOI:
10.1016/j.nec.2009.09.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center